Meanwhile, Back in the States…

Iron Maiden. Angel Witch. Tygers of Pan Tang. Saxon. Def Leppard. All great bands. Each contributed at least one genre-defining album to the NWOBHM, a movement that revived and revitalized the lifeless carcass of Heavy Metal after the Punk Rock explosion near the end of the ’70s. Or… were they simply in the right place at the right time?

“NWOBHM was a fiction, really, an invention of Geoff Barton and Sounds. It was a cunning ruse to boost circulation. Having said that, it did represent a lot of bands that were utterly ignored by the mainstream media. Because of that it became real and people got behind it.”
-Bruce Dickinson

Time and place were crucial, as the media-driven music culture of the UK was waiting for the next ‘thing’ after the Punk furor died out in just a few short years (when the look and sound of Punk became a ‘look’ and a ‘sound’, it was already over). So a random sampling of new (and unsigned) Brit metal bands were exposed to the general public in one of the biggest music weeklies on the continent, and a new musical movement was born. Of course, Metal bands had been forming and breaking up all over the world, as they had been for a decade… just not under the white hot spotlight of the British music press.72de789a455668f93acea7ac5ac4cf12

At the same time in America, Circus Magazine published an article entitled ‘Will Heavy Metal Survive the 70’s?’, while Creem Magazine had basically declared Heavy Metal dead just by asking the question, ‘Is Heavy Metal Dead?’ on the cover of their October ’79 issue. Having not yet been clued into the burgeoning NWOBHM, Circus and CREEM surveyed the post-Punk Metal landscape and found it wanting. Zeppelin, Sabbath and Purple were all MIA, and the ‘second wave’ of mostly U.S. bands had just dropped a bunch of duds: Aerosmith with ‘Night in the Ruts’, BOC’s ‘Mirrors’, KISS’ ‘Dynasty’, Nugent’s ‘Weekend Warriors’. Something needed to happen, and quickly… Enter the NWOBHM.

According to the popular media on both sides of the Atlantic, it would appear that the NWOBHM really did save HM. And once the press got the ball rolling, it seemed like something exciting was once again happening in the UK. Young metal bands with a new streamlined sound were popping up all over Britain, breathing life into a tired genre. The US Rock press jumped on board in 1980, further validating the movement as a legit musical phenomenon. NOWBHM bands got some US print exposure, and the young British bands started to gain some notoriety across the pond. Metal’s UK resurgence went global. Day: Saved.

But did it actually need saving? As mentioned previously, most established U.S. stadium-fillers were experiencing a serious slump, although Van Halen and Rush managed to put out successful albums during the NWOBHM years. Where these two bands strong enough to carry the American fire? Was there nothing else metallic happening in the good ole’ USA between 1979 and 1981?

To answer that question, we have to duck under the radar just a bit, and also widen the net to include Canada. Yes, several classic albums (and some worthy obscurities) came out of while the NWOetc monopolized Metal Nation’s attention. Most of these North American bands endured the Punk Era only to find that everyone’s attention had instantly shifted to the UK Metal scene, so let’s all pause for a few to pay them a little attention.

Here ya go: a run-down of 12 notable records released by North American bands during the NWOBHM that you may have missed, by year:

Sammy Hagar / Street Machine 1979
After searching for a solid direction on his first 3 post-Montrose solo albums, Hagar becomes the Red Rocker for real on his 4th studio album ‘Street Machine’. What took him so long? Hagar and band kick into high gear with a set of all-original material (his previous solo efforts were peppered with covers) that showcase his guitar playing, his amazing band, and his ballsy R n’ R attitude. Hagar was clearly on a mission here, as ‘Street Machine’ was the first album of material written and produced solely by Sammy himself. ‘Trans Am (Highway Wonderland)’ and ‘This Planet’s on Fire (Burn in Hell)’ are highlights. Hagar would do one more record in this direction (1980’s uneven ‘Danger Zone’) before signing with Geffen and becoming an AOR star.

St. Paradise 1979mi0003247544
Put Denny Carmassi, drummer on all 4 Montrose albums and 2 of Sammy Hagar’s solo records, together with Derek St Homes and Bob Grange, half of the band that made Ted Nugent’s first 3 albums, and what do you get? Well… With John Corey on keyboards, this ‘supergroup’ signed to Warner Bros. and recorded a classy, radio-friendly hard rock record… at the worst possible time. It was great to hear St Homes’ voice again (guy should have been a mega-star) and this record is far better than the Whitford/St Homes album from 1981; but nothing, and I mean nothing happened, and the band barely lasted one year. Curiously includes a ‘cover’ of Nugent’s ‘Live it Up’, a song that St. Holmes co-wrote and sang for Ted’s ‘Cat Scratch Fever’ album in 1977. ‘St. Paradise’ is hard to find but worth it.

Pat Travers Band / Live! Go For What You Know 1979
Canadian Pat Travers solidified his backing band in 1977, adding Tommy Aldridge and Pat Thrall, and hit paydirt with the essential ‘Heat in the Street’ in ’78. For ‘Live! Go for What You Know’, recorded in the US during the ‘Heat’ tour, Travers changed his moniker to ‘The Pat Travers Band’, and rightly so; this line-up kicks serious ass. Thrall and Travers were a match made in heaven, raising the late-70s shred game by several notches, all the while backed by a rhythm section unparalleled in 70s Hard Rock. Wisely held to a single album of faves from Travers’ 4 studio albums, it’s a tight, powerful statement by a band that must have been an intimidating opening act. Non-single ‘Boom Boom (Out Go the Lights)’ was a welcome blast of amped-up axework on American radio during the summer of 1979.

The Rods/ Rock Hard 1980rods-the-rock-hard
The Rods were a scrappy 3-piece from NYC who played hard-as-nails, meat and potatoes street metal, with the occasional harmony vocal and catchy chorus. In 1980, the band put together some demos and self-released their first LP ‘Rock Hard’, limited to 1,000 copies. Packed with simple, driving hard rock, with bar band chops and dum-dum lyrics, ‘Rock Hard’, um… rocks hard. This is what we’d always hoped the Godz sounded like. (Godz/Rods? Hmmm…) ‘Rock Hard’ was an underground hit, and was picked up by Arista, remixed, re-sequenced and re-released with a Ramones-like cover pic in 1981 as ‘The Rods’. Guitarist/vocalist David ‘Rock’ Feinstein is the cousin of one Ronald Padavona, and played on the first Elf album in 1974.

Gamma / Gamma 2 1980
Montrose (the band) ended after two mediocre post-Hagar records, and after releasing an excellent instrumental solo album (‘Open Fire’), Ronnie Montrose updated his sound with a new band: Gamma. Featuring the very latest in synthesizer technology, Gamma sounded hi-tech and thoroughly modern. Montrose’s guitar sound and playing style had also evolved, and as the techno-flash 80s arrived, Ronnie was ahead of the game. Gamma had achieved the impossible: synthesizer-heavy hard rock. It was a daring move for Montrose, and this new sound worked best on ‘Gamma 2’. Album openers ‘Meanstreak’ and ‘The Four Horsemen’ pack a serious punch, While ‘Cat on a Leash’ and ‘Skin and Bone’ stretch the band’s sound boldly into the future. One of the coolest album covers ever. Rest in Peace, Ronnie.

Blackfoot / Tomcattin’ 1980
Blackfoot had been kickin’ around for a few years before the NWOBHM arrived, releasing albums on Island and Columbia before moving to Atlantic and cranking up the crunch on their third, ‘Strikes’. ‘Strikes’ is probably the ‘go-to’ Blackfoot record for many, as it contains ‘Train, Train’ and ‘Highway Song’, two radio hits that earned the band their first ‘Gold’ record. But ‘Strikes’ at a very short 33 minutes and contains only 5 original tunes… Might I suggest the follow-up, ‘Tomcattin’? A solid southern ass-whoopin’ from start to finish, Rick Medlocke and gang power through what is probably the hardest southern rock album ever, leaving Molly Hatchet and their ilk in the dust. Medlocke leads the way with a confident swagger, and the guitars are 10 feet tall. A much more satisfying record than ‘Strikes’.

Y&T / Earthshaker 198152283045_1
Y&T were the missing link between Montrose and Van Halen; in fact, the mighty VH used to open for them. After two promising albums as Yesterday and Today, the band signed to the majors (A&M), shortened their name to Y&T (A&M… Y&T…!) and finally nailed their sound. Earthshaker roars out of the speakers, a powerhouse of crunchy SoCal party rock honed in countless California dive bars. Earthshaker’s winning balance between power ballad harmonies and scorching hard rock would prove very influential as the 80’s progressed. Y&T broke through to the 80’s Metal mainstream with their next two albums ‘Black Tiger’ and ‘Mean Streak’, but their true breakthrough was ‘Earthshaker’…a record that could only have been made by an American band.

Riot / Fire Down Under 1981
Despite hailing from New York, Riot were awarded ‘honorary’ NWOBHM status due to the UK underground’s embrace of their first two indie albums ‘Rock City’ and ‘Narita’, their frequent appearance on DJ Neal Kay’s metal playlist in ‘Sounds’, and their obvious musical inspiration to many young UK bands of the era. All of this led to their appearance at the first Monsters of Rock festival at Castle Donnington, on of the key events in the development of the NWOBHM. But their popularity with the movement was a double-edged sword… The story of ‘Fire Down Under’ is a tragic one, and I’ve written in-depth about the record here: https://wordpress.com/post/mayobat.wordpress.com/726, but if you are inclined to check out any of the records discussed here, start with this one. ‘FDU’ is not only Riot’s finest album, it is one of the greatest American metal albums of all time, with only Montrose’s debut keeping it out of the top slot.

Frank Marino / The Power of Rock and Roll 1981
Yes, this is Marino’s 8th album, it’s also his most straight-ahead metal record. It’s Marino’s first with out the ‘Mahogany Rush’ tag, first with brother Vince on 2nd guitar, and most of the jazz noodling and Hendrix influence, so prevalent on previous albums, is now largely absent. But it’s the presence of one specific track, ‘Ain’t Dead Yet’, that demands attention here; not just because Marino rips through the song with an urgency and fluidity that is seriously scary, but the song’s lyrics answer CREEM Magazine’s ‘Is Heavy Metal Dead?’ headline and encapsulates the frustration and futility felt by many North American bands that survived the Punk era, as well as the hope for a resurgence fueled by the NWOBHM:

All around we hear the sound the voices in our ears
They try to bring our whole world down playin’ on our fears
Designing rules, deciding who, they’re gonna give the chance to
And all the while, the phony smile, they just want to romance you
It’s time that we fight now
The timing is right now
Well did you hear what they said?
They’re tellin’ us rock is dead
Well we ain’t dead yet!’

So there’s your proof! A handful of solid listening from an oft-overlooked time period in American Hard Rock/Heavy Metal history. How do they stack up against the records released at the same time by the young upstarts across the pond? Well… any comparisons wouldn’t be fair, because most of the records highlighted here were made by seasoned veterans; the youthful energy and freshness inherent in the NWOBHM’s best records make them hard to beat. But there’s a lot of worthy music here that has been unfairly ignored and neglected. Frank Marino was right: American Metal wasn’t dead during the NWOBHM… Maybe on life support, but not dead. Tell it, Frank!

1977: Love Guns vs. Sex Pistols

If you follow Metal’s timeline from its origins in the late ’60s, and continue through its classic early-to-mid ’70s heyday, you will eventually encounter something of a dead end near the end of the decade: The Punk era. Metal was at it’s lowest ebb near the end of the 70’s, as most of the giants had either gone missing (Zeppelin), broken up (Purple) or gotten seriously off-track (Sabbath), while their American ‘Second Wave’ counterparts (Aerosmith, Kiss, BOC) were ‘experimenting’ with Disco, Pop, or hard drugs. Enter: Punk Rock, to point out how tired, overblown and boring mainstream Rock music had gotten, and wipe the slate clean and make way for something new. The situation was so dire that in October of 1979, Creem Magazine ran a cover story entitled ‘Is Heavy Metal Dead?’

72de789a455668f93acea7ac5ac4cf12

Of course, this standardized version of the history of that era is of course a gross oversimplification: Heavy Metal did not ‘die’ at the hands of the punks, only to be ‘reborn’ in the UK (with the NWOBHM) after punk self-destructed. The truth of the matter is that Metal continued to operate, albeit in a diminished capacity, throughout the uproar. The Punk Rock explosion posed the biggest threat in the UK, where its impact was felt as a genuine cultural phenomenon; Punk bands dominated the UK press, and Punk singles and albums charted high. Punk’s raison d’etre, to ‘Smash It Up’, with ‘it’ being Rock’s status quo, was a direct shot across the bow to the established UK Rock and Metal bands of the day.

Some HR/HM bands just starting out in ’76 wisely ignored Punk completely; Rainbow’s ‘On Stage’, released in the summer of 1977, raised the bar for never-ending, self-indulgent soloing, and Judas Priest released ‘Sad Wings of Destiny’, a record that helped shape the template for the HM genre, and then soldiered forth as the ailing genre’s standard-bearers. But most of the established UK HR/HM bands of the 1970s could mark the end of their ‘classic era’ right around 1976/77; aside from the aforementioned, consider Foghat, Uriah Heep, Status Quo, Wishbone Ash… all emerged from the fray mortally wounded, some searching for a new direction, some just sounding tired and obsolete, setting the stage for the NWOBHM.

mi0001448346As an example of just how drastically things changed in Britain’s music scene, consider Slade. After a long string of hit singles (a stunning seventeen consecutive Top Twenty hits, twelve of them Top Five, and six of those were Number Ones!), Slade headed off to try to break America in 1976. After returning to England in ’77, Slade quickly discovered that they were old news and nearly forgotten. Three of their next four singles charted at #53, #48, and #32; one didn’t chart at all. Their next six singles failed to chart at all in the UK. The title of their first LP after returning to England says it all: ‘Whatever Happened to Slade?’ It, too, failed to trouble the UK charts. In the space of 12 months, the single most successful Hard Rock band in Britain had been rendered irrelevant.

Other well-established bands responded, even if only by commenting on the fray through their music. ‘Lights Out’, UFO’s sixth record, came out in May of 1977. For the album’s title track, UFO’s lyricist, Phil Mogg, referenced the punk uprising through military imagery:

‘From the back streets there’s a rumbling
Smell of anarchy
No more nice time, black boy shoe shines
Pie in the sky dreams’

And of course, the title of the song/album is a direct nod to blackout regulations imposed during The Battle of Britain, aka ‘the Blitz’, where Londoners were urged to extinguish all lights to hamper German nighttime bombing raids:

‘Lights out, lights out in London, hold on tight till the end

UFO released ‘Lights Out’ just as the Sex Pistols’ 2nd single, ‘God Save the Queen’, hit #2 in the UK singles chart. Six months earlier, the Pistols’ ‘Anarchy in the UK’ single had climbed to #26. None of UFO’s 9 singles had charted in the UK. Mogg and his band, having seen Punk singles climbing the charts and the movement dominating the press, knew another Battle of Britain was underway.nmecover_july2_1977

Queen’s ‘News of the World’ came out in July of 1977. The title of the album is a reference to the British tabloid paper News of the World, an infamously trashy broadsheet that regularly featured the most scandalous and sensational national stories of the day. Here Queen were referencing the top UK music papers, such as Sounds and the NME, who were at that time thoroughly enamored with the Punk phenomenon; not only reporting on the musical and cultural shifts but also capitalizing on the sensational aspects of the movement by plastering ‘shocking’ headlines and ‘alarming’ pictures of punks in full mohawk & safety pin regalia.

The cover art for Queen’s 5th album also comments on the Punk movement. Queen are depicted as dead, having been killed by a giant robot as a panicked crowd below flees in terror. Inside the gatefold, the robot reaches for more victims. It’s not difficult to decipher the ironic message here: Monster destroys beloved band; you’re next. But the music on ‘News of the World’ also contains a few nods to Punk Rock, most obvious of which is the song ‘Sheer Heart Attack’, which is flat-out Punk. Roger Taylor said in 1991:

“It’s quite interesting, because we were making an album next-door to a punk band, the Sex Pistols, and it really fit into that punk explosion that was happening at the time, which was happening right then. It was actually better that it happened that it came out on the ‘News of the World’ album.”

newsoftheworldOn ‘News of the World’, Queen take on several forms of music: Salsa, Psychedelic Rock, Torch Balladry, the Blues, even football chants, so throwing in a take on Punk would not have been out of place in the least. But ‘Sheer Heart Attack’ is more than Queen showing their versatility; here, it’s cultural commentary. With lyrics like ‘Well you’re just 17 and all you wanna do is disappear/You know what I mean there’s a lot of space between your ears/I feel so ina-ina-ina-ina-ina-ina-ina-ina-inarticulate’, it wasn’t hard to read exactly how lyricist Roger Taylor felt about the Punk Rock audience.

Interestingly, Taylor rights the scales on his ‘Fight From the Inside’, by taking on the point of view of a punk rocker and pointing the finger at the pop stars of the pre-punk era (I.e., himself/his band), and urging the listener to fight to change the status quo:

‘You’re just another picture on a teenage wall
You’re just another sucker ready for a fall
You’re just another money-spinner tool
You’re just another fool 

You gotta fight from the inside
Attack from the rear
Fight from the inside
You can’t win with your hands tied’

Queen’s next album, ‘Jazz’ would include more commentary by Taylor on the transformation of the UK music scene and his band’s place in it. In the album’s final song, called ‘More of That Jazz’, Taylor seems to be complaining about being spoon-fed the same old thing:

‘If you’re feeling tired and lonely
Uninspired and lonely
If you’re thinking how the days seem long
All you’re given
Is what you’ve been given a thousand times before
Just more more
More of that jazz
More no more of that jazz
Give me no more
No more of that jazz’

The song winds up with several snippets from the album’s previous songs, edited together in a montage of the album’s highlights, in effect giving the listener more of ‘Jazz’… and implying that the album you just listened to is just ‘more of that jazz’. For Taylor, always Queen’s resident ‘punk’, the Punk movement clearly instigated some serious self-examination. Queen were at a crossroads during the Punk era; the band would survive the upheaval and move from strength to strength, but would never be the same.

With Punk Rock’s disdain for virtuosity and technical ability came the death of the guitar hero. One of the UK’s biggest was Robin Trower, who charted high in the Top 40 with his 3rd and 4th albums… Then the punk bomb exploded, knocking him down into the low 50’s and then off the charts completely for his 1978 album ‘Caravan to Midnight’. Robin who? His next record would be titled ‘Victims of the Fury’, in a pointed reference to his own diminished stature, and feature a stripped-down, earthy sound, with few overdubs and a renewed abrasive energy. The title track’s lyrics told the tale:

‘We were blessed as though in heaven
We were messengers of joy
There were angels all around us
There was none who dared destroy

Then the world collapsed around us
And the tables overturned
We were lambs before the slaughter
We were driven out and burned

Victims of the fury
Shadows in the dark
Victims of the fury
Arrows found their mark’

Pat Travers, a young Canadian guitarist who emigrated to the UK to seek fame and fortune, found it; he scored a record deal with Polydor and appeared at the Reading Festival before 35,000 in 1976, just before all hell broke loose. On his third album, ‘Putting it Straight’, he explains why he decided to hightail it to America in 1977, in a song called ‘Life in London’:

‘Life in London is bittersweet
Spray can slogans along the street
Some kind of revolution in the town
Razor blades and safety pins make you look like a clown’

Prog Rock gods Yes were an obvious target for Punk rockers’ derision, with their ‘pretentious’ this and their ‘self-indulgent’ that… But Yes’ success was unhindered by the advent of Punk, with their 1977 album ‘Going for the One’ reaching the top of the UK charts and it’s follow-up, 1978’s ‘Tormato’ going Top Ten. ‘Tormato’, however, contains some artistic commentary on the goings on of the previous 18 months, beginning with it’s cover, where a picture of man dressed in period clothing and using divining rods is pelted with a tomato. This can be interpreted as a blatant rejection of ‘the old ways’, or, if we view the man with the divining rods as employing ‘divination’, or searching for something using ‘magical’ methods… an artist following his muse, perhaps… Splat!

tormato_cd_germany_booklet0‘Tormato’ contains a song called ‘Release, Release’, which is as punk a song as Yes would ever be capable of. Its odd time signatures, multiple key changes, and super-busy arrangement prevent it from ever being confused with a Ramones tune, but its stripped-down rock and roll feel, up-tempo delivery and surprisingly direct delivery reflect the energy of the Punk phenom; also Jon Anderson’s spacey lyrics contain ample evidence of an awareness of the turmoil, and perhaps a plea for us to rise above the conflict:

‘Have you heard before, hit it out, don’t look back
Rock is the medium of our generation
Stand for every right, kick it out, hear you shout
For the right of all of creation

Power defy our needs, lift us up, show us now
Show us how amid the rack of confusion Power at first to the needs of each others’ days
Simple to lose in the void sounds of anarchy’s calling ways

Straight jacket, freedom’s march, is it all, far beyond
Our reason of understanding
Campaign everything, anti-right, anti-left Release, release, enough controllers’

At about 2:57, the song left-turns into that most dreaded of all arena-rock staples: a drum solo, played out over a recording of a cheering stadium audience. This self-deprecating gesture added a welcome touch of irony to the album, as the band that brought us ‘Tales From Topographic Oceans’, perhaps the absolute pinnacle of Prog excess, struggled to find footing in a hostile musical landscape.

Love it or hate it, Punk Rock was a game changer. UK Heavy Rock’s response to Punk Rock made 1977 a truly fascinating year in Heavy music, forcing many of the established bands of the day to react artistically in one way or another, and giving us a handful of records that stand out as unique in the HR/HM canon. If they’re not your cup of tea, don’t forget: many Rock bands that didn’t face the Punk movement head on were instead ‘experimenting’ with Disco…

61ugvd63gtl__sy300_

 

Ain’t No Fun (Waiting Round to be a Millionaire)

The following is a true story
Only the names have been changed
To protect the guilty

Well I left my job in my home town
And I headed for the smoke
Got a rock n’ roll band and a fast right hand
Gonna get to the top
Nothing’s gonna stop us no nothing

So if you’ve got the money, we’ve got the sound
You put it up and we’ll put it down
If you got the dollar, we got the song
Just want to boogie woogie all night long
Yeah boogie

I got holes in my shoes
I got holes in my teeth
I got holes in my socks
I can’t get no sleep
I’m trying to make a million

-From AC/DC’s ‘Ain’t No Fun (Waiting Round to be a Millionaire)’

(Lyrics by Ronald Belford Scott)

…………..

He was the youngest of 8 siblings, born in Cranhill, Glasgow, Scottland. At the age of 8, his father uprooted his wife and four of their children and emigrated to Sydney, Australia, in hopes of finding work. Two of his older brothers played the guitar; after two years of plonking away on a beat up banjo, his mother finally bought him a battered used acoustic. No formal lessons were ever taken; in fact, he dropped out of Ashfield Boy’s High School before his fifteenth birthday.

He soon ended up in a teen gang called the Town Hall Sharps, where he developed a love of Rock & Roll and Blues Music. Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Jery Lee Lewis were favorites. Before he turned 18, he worked overnights in a butcher shop and declined an apprenticeship as a typesetter. Possessing no marketable skills, his career prospects looked bleak. He bought his first ‘real’ guitar, a ’67 Gibson SG, from Chord Music in Burwood. Like his brothers, he taught himself how to play well enough to work with a few local bands. In 1973, he joined a band formed by one of his older siblings. It was 1973; he was 18 years old.

His chances at making it as a profesional musician weren’t good. For starters, his formal education ended with the 8th grade, and possessed no musical knowledge whatsoever. Secondly, the rock scene in Sydney, and in Australia in general, was desperately aping the UK Glam movement, a sound and style that he and his brother dabbled with but in the end, had very little time for. And finally, even if they were able to break into the tiny Australian music market, their prospects were even dimmer in the UK, where the real fame and noteriety was. And, of course, you never really made it until you made it in America, home to his guitar heroes Leslie West and Buddy Guy, as well as some of his favorite bands, like Cactus and ZZ Top. America… The biggest music market in the world…

But hey, even a uneducated punk from the tenements of Carnhill could dream.

……………

Does your playing constantly progress? Do you ever get into slumps?

“I’ve never gotten in a slump as far as playing, because I never got that serious about it.”

It is a true test for Young to recall the types of picks and strings he uses. While he does know more than he owns up to, his description of himself as a guitar “illiterate” is not far wrong. He learned to solo mainly from watching his elder brother Malcolm play and the idea of scales and figures is foreign to him.

Do you have a fairly good idea of what you’re going to do with solos?

“No, I never work that out before. It’s mainly spontaneous. Soloing was pretty easy for me because it was probably the first thing I’ve ever done. I just used to make up leads. I never even knew any names of chords until Malcolm told me and then I picked it up from there.”

Do you know what you’re doing in musical terms?

“I haven’t a clue.”

You don’t work on scales.

“Nah.”

Uncertain about scales and note names, he has never had difficulty in resisting the lure of the pedal. His sound is uncluttered and pure and one of the true milestones of rock guitar The only accoutrement engaged is a Schaeffer wireless system he obtained in 1977 and has been using ever since.

Do you use any effects?

“No. I found that pedals were too much to fool around with.”

How important is equipment?

“Well, I like it to work.”

Angus makes special visits to the Marshall factory outside of London to play through a series of amps before selecting the proper one(s). He says the units are then doctored to resemble the old-style amps which were very clean and have no master or preamp setting.

“I use a real lot of volume, I turn that up; I turn the treble and bass on about half and middle, the same. I don’t use any presence.”

Do you ever record with guitars other than SGs?

“No. I’ve just used the SGs.”

Young bought a secondhand Gibson SG as a teen. A brown 1967 model. The instrument was his ‘go-to’ guitar until just a few years ago, when wood rot (due to excessive moisture from sweat) and neck warp forced him to look for a replacement. Young liked the thin neck of his first guitar, and it took some searching to find another to his liking. Another suitable SG was finally located in a pawn shop in NYC; brown, 1967 model, same thin neck.

……………..

Of his three homes, the one he built for his wife in Aalten, in the east of the Netherlands, was his favorite. Perhaps for sentimental reasons; for decades he lived with his wife in the small house directly across the street from the just-completed multi-million dollar mansion. But it was time for an upgrade. The houses in Australia and the UK were fine, but he wanted to do something special for her in her home country. Indeed, it was especially for her, his wife of more than thirty years, as he wasn’t in Denmark for more than 10-12 weeks a year. His wife helped design and decorate.

And so, their new home was built in the quiet little village of Aalten, population 12,000. Aalten, where her parents ran the local blacksmith business. At first, neighbors complained about the building’s size. The local newspapers ran a few stories, but the villagers’ greivenaces didn’t amount to much. He was a very private man, but well-liked in the town by those who knew him. He knew that if he stayed the course, kept quiet about it, the hubub would pass. And so it did.

Villagers who were not acqainted with him personally must have wondered how their mysterious neighbor was able to build such an expensive home for his wife. When the home was completed, and its owner became an official resident of Aalten, Gelderland, all questions were answered, as the papers reported that their mysterious neighbor was one of the 500 richest men in the Netherlands, with a net worth of 140 million dollars. How in God’s name did this odd little man amass a fortune of 140 million dollars? The village blacksmith’s son-in-law? That little man who walks up the road to buy cigarettes at the local garage every morning?

…………….

Worldwide Album Sales: 200 million; US Sales: 71.5 million

‘Back in Black’: 50 million copies worldwide, 22 million copies US

‘Back in Black’ is the second highest-selling album in history.

AC/DC are the fifth-most-certified band in history.

AC/DC are the twelfth-best-selling artist in all of music history.

 

Not bad for a uneducated punk from the tenements of Cranhill.

 

(Contains material from interviews in Guitar Player and Guitar world, both from 1984)

 

Alex and the Imaginary Guitar

Today, it’s common knowledge among fans of heavy rock that Rush, aka The Best Band Ever, has a great sense of humor. But it wasn’t always this way. Rush’s first ten years revealed little in the way of yucks. Their philosophical lyrical slant and their ultra-advanced musicianship indicated a more cerebral approach, and the band’s overall vibe was a bit stiff, a little dour even. The gradual influx of humor into the Rush universe went a long way toward making the band more relatable as they achieved mainstream success. But well before this element of the band’s personality became firmly established, a certain little joke one member of the band made was taken seriously by a whole lotta people, and over the decades has taken on a life of its’ own. Here’s what happened:

The first inklings of Rush’s penchant for in-jokes and Python-esque silliness began to emerge through guitarist Alex Lifeson, as the band entered the 1980s. Lifeson is renowned these days as Rush’s resident funnyman (watch their 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction speeches for a notable sample), but the programme from the band’s 1982 ‘Signals’ tour is where Lifeson’s sense of the absurd first appeared in full bloom. In stark counterpoint to Neil and Geddy’s studious (and boring) listing of their touring equipment, Alex uses his space to get downright goofy. Here it is:

I‘ve broken down the equipment I’m using into three categories; amplification, guitarification and effectification. It is truly an amazing coincidence how similar all three categories are to each other. For instance, through my keen sense of awareness, I’ve noticed all three have a series of knobs! Can you believe it? Also the amps and assorted effects all have glowing lights! Incredible! The amps I’m using are four Marshall Combos which we jokingly refer to as the Marshall Combos. In the guitar department I’m down to four, a black one, a red one, a white one and a brownish one. They all have six strings and a long wooden piece sticking out from the body. I also have two acoustic guitars both with six strings, one steel string and the other plastic (or something like that). Both the guitars have rounded bodies to make them impossible to play sitting down. They also have holes all over the sound board which is sort of like a diving board I think. My double neck guitar was recently crushed by an elephant. Too bad.”

movingpictures-10

“For effects, I have many. Two Yamaha E1010 Analog Delays, Delta Lab DL-5 Harmonizer, Loft Analog Delays, Advanced Audio Digital Delay, Roland Boss Chorus, Electric Mistress Flanger, Mutron Octave Divider, M.X.R. Distortion Plus, Westinghouse Blender, Cry Baby Wah Wah, two Amana Freezers, Morely Volume Pedal, a gas pedal, a flower pedal, Maestro Parametric Filter, Cigarette Filter, six nozzles, three lungs and a M.X.R. Micro Amp. All of these effects are capable of producing a wide range of sounds. Some are scary while some are awful. I prefer the scary sounds. Also I’d just like to mention that I … ah, um, uh, … I have to go now.”

Even the pic accompanying the gear rundown is a little silly. Maybe Lifeson was just bored after 8 years of touring; maybe felt a little free after reaching the level of success that he and his band had recently achieved. Whatever the reason, Lifeson had found a place to begin asserting some true personality.

The following year would see the release of ‘Grace Under Pressure’, more touring, and another tour programme. This time around, Lifeson once again used the equipment page to have a little fun:

“So another tour, huh? Well let’s see. I’ve got these great new guitars. You may have heard of them; they’re Hentors. They’re named after Devidip Hentor who was a very interesting character. He was born some years ago and grew to amazing lengths. Instead of body hair he grew a kind of green woolly substance all over his upper torso which resembled a sweater. He was a brilliant man who could sit in a chair all day and think of a million great things to do without actually doing them. He was an inspiration until his unfortunate accident whilst jogging in three feet of snow wearing cheap snowboots and light summer cottons. Two models were built and I’m lucky enough to have them both. One is a “Sportscaster” and the other is I’m not going to tell you. (Hey, check Geddy’s page and see if he mentions his Hentor Barbarian bass!) Anyway, these guitars look a lot like the guitars I had on the last 47 tours. So much so that if someone was really stupid they’d think they were different guitars. I also got a new Jimmy Johnson and I haven’t seen one of those in at least eight years. Otherwise everything’s the same. So, here we go…I use amps! And magic guitars that have no long black wires; and talk about strings! I have at least six on all my guitars. I also use expensive boxes with knobs and lights on them and instructions in more than five languages except English. I also have these piano-like things but I’m not sure on how to switch them on. You have to use a special Jack for that. Finally, all the equipment I use is made in factories.”

Lifeson’s mention of his ‘Hentor’ guitars, and specifically the ‘Hentor Sportscaster’, triggered a minor earthquake in the world of guitar nerd-dom. The mention of getting ‘a new Jimmy Johnson’ didn’t raise any eyebrows, as it was assumed by many to be a reference to the Fender Telecaster, which Muscle Shoals session guitarist Jimmy Johnson was known to play frequently. The ‘Hentor’ mention was different, as just above Lifeson’s gear list entry was a picture of the guitarist himself holding a guitar… According to the lettering on the headstock, it was a gen-u-wine Hentor Sportscaster. Soon, gearheads all over the world were scratching their heads and attempting to research this mysterious instrument.

graceunderpressure-7-ss

 

Thousands were seeing and hearing Alex Lifeson play a white Hentor Sportscaster every night on the GUP world tour… driving guitar nerds out of their minds with curiosity. Guitar Player Magazine was deluged with letters asking for information about Hentor guitars. The influx of queries prompted the editors to publish a response, stating that they had no information on the guitar and no knowledge of a company by that name. Perhaps they were custom-built? Rush HQ were slammed with mail on Hentors as well. Meanwhile, an interview with Lifeson in the August issue of Guitar Player Magazine provided some clues. Firstly, Lifeson confirms the ‘Jimmy Johnson’/Fender Tele connection:

 

“I used a Tele for the first time ever in my life for rhythm on ‘Kid Gloves’ and ‘The Enemy Within’… The Tele is less than a year old.”

Then Alex goes on to discuss modifications done on three Fender Strats:

“I put in a Gibson-type toggle switch on the horn of my Strats and moved the volume and one tone control down a bit and got rid of the other tone control. I also have custom pickguards that are a little bit different. I changed the toggle switch because I didn’t like where the stock Fender one was… The necks are different, too. They were made by a company in Ottawa called Shark. The fingerboards are just bare rosewood, with no finish on them whatsoever… I have a Bill Lawrence L-500 lead pickup in the back position of all my guitars, and standard Fenders in the rhythm and bass positions. The white Strat has DiMarzios.”

Lifeson played these modified Strats from 1981-1986. The white model was used for the ‘Permanent Waves’ album, and the red and black versions were added and used on ‘Moving Pictures’, ‘Signals’, ‘Grace Under Pressure’, and ‘Power Windows’. All three were ‘retired’ after the ‘Power Windows’ tour. The black mod can be seen in the ‘Limelight’ video, the cherry red (w/mirrored pickguard) is played in the ‘Distant Early Warning’ video, and the white guitar, which he played most extensively, is featured several times in the ‘Grace Under Pressure’ live DVD.

 

The Hentor Sportscasters had been right there in front of our noses.

After unleashing two years of confusion and frustration into the guitar community, Alex Lifeson casually confirmed that his three modified Strats were re-christened as ‘Hentors’ while recording the ‘GUP’ album in 1986. In a feature published in Guitar Player in ’86, Rush’s jolly jokester delivers the punchline:

“‘Hentor’ was the name that we had for Peter Henderson, the producer of ‘Grace Under Pressure.’ When he wrote his name out to leave us his number, it looked like Peter Hentor instead of Peter Henderson, so we nicknamed him Hentor The Barbarian. I got some Letraset (label-maker tape) and put it on this white Strat that I had. It has a Shark neck – these are unlabeled replacement necks – so I threw ‘Hentor Sportscaster’ on there. Amazing all the mail we used to get over that [laughs]: ‘Where can I buy a Hentor? How much does a Hentor cost?'”

Mystery solved. But the story’s not over… Fast Forward a decade or so, where guitar building hobbyists are building duplicates of their favorite guitarist’s axes, working from information gleaned from interviews, and photographs and videos of the real thing. In internet chat groups and fan forums, amateur builders compare notes and pics, sharing construction details and comparing their work online. The Hentor ‘brand’ is thriving in the gearhead replica underground, with fans getting as close as they can to Lifeson’s three modified Strats using replacement parts and home-made paint jobs.

The replica phenomenon also happens at a higher level: several renowned guitar brands and professional luthiers have stepped into the specialty replica market over the years, reverse-engineering some truly historic guitars, and producing high-quality replicas, duplicated right down to the scratched-up paint and rusted screws, for sale in limited numbers. Brian May’s home-made ‘Red Special’, Rory Gallagher’s battered 1961 Fender Strat, and perhaps most notably, Eddie Van Halen’s ‘Frankenstrat’. We are talking high-end here, folks; three hundred meticulously-detailed replicas of the red-and-black-and-white-striped Frankenstrat were made by Fender Custom Shop in 2007 and offered by Van Halen’s EVH brand… For $25,000 each.

The Hentor’s transition from Alex Lifeson’s three Hentor ‘prototypes’ to a line of commercially-available guitars happened somewhere in between these two worlds. In 2008, Freddy Gabrsek, a luthier based in Niagra-on-the-Lake, Ontario, requested permission to replicate and sell Alex Lifeson’s white Sportscaster. Lifeson, who revealed in a 2005 Guitar Player article that he was still frequently asked about his Hentors, granted permission, with the stipulation that a portion of the sales be funneled to Lifeson’s ‘Grapes Under Pressure’ charitable foundation. Lifeson loaned his white ‘Caster to Freddy for six months, and viola: a genuine, authentic Hentor Sportscaster is born, serial number (‘1’) and all.

lifeson-hentor-2

So if you’re in the market for a 100% legit Hentor Sportscaster, do an internet search for Freddy’s Frets and Freddy will hook you up. Gabrsek makes it abundantly clear on his web page that, although the Hentor started out as a humorous in-joke, these guitars are nothing to laugh at. And anyone who says that Hentor Sportscasters are merely copies of modified Strats has no sense of humor.

 

 

The Ace and Peter (No) Show

KISS was my generation’s initiation into rock music. My own infatuation with KISS was brief but intense. ‘Rock and Roll Over’ was the first record I ever bought, and the first concert I ever attended was KISS in Providence, RI on Feb 2nd, 1978. ‘She’ was the first song I ever learned to play on the guitar. If I’m honest, I’d have to admit that the term ‘hero worship’ might be appropriate in my case. That said, I lost interest in KISS after ‘Alive II’, mainly because I could sense that there was suddenly something …not right… about KISS, but also because I became aware of so many bands that put out better records than the four solo albums, or ‘Dynasty’. And then ‘Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park’ happened… Even after moving on, I still have a deep love of their early records and fond memories of their impact on my life.

Today, as an adult, and after reflecting on the KISS phenomenon brings up many interesting questions. What does it mean to be a member of a band? What are a band member’s responsibilities? What are a band’s responsibilities to its fans?

In many cases, especially in bands that have reached a certain level of financial success, being a member of a band means being a member of a corporation, or could perhaps include entering into a legal partnership. Cheap Trick became a ‘corporation’ decades ago, and when drummer Bun E. Carlos stepped down from active duty six years ago, he still retained the right to an equal vote in band business, and still earns a 1/4 share of band revenue, even though the band replaced him with another drummer. This was all according to the charter the band members signed back in the ’70s. So sometimes band membership is a complex thing; sometimes exiting a band is not as simple as ‘quitting’ or getting ‘fired’.

In KISS’s case, here was a band who spent years building a façade made of clearly-defined characters, with the band members codified into instantly-recognizable symbols; once the ‘brand’ had been firmly established in popular culture, the band was reluctant to mess with it. But KISS, like Cheap Trick, had become a corporation after the success of ‘Destroyer’, with all four members sharing in the revenue equally and having equal voting power on major band decisions… including decisions relating to terminating a shareholder’s membership. This forced KISS into some difficult situations, when certain band members’ functionality became questionable… starting right around the ‘Alive II’ album.

creem_03

KISS’s first three records are the real deal: authentic hard rock albums made by four so-so musicians with a shared vision, forced to crank out 3 records in 13 months, with a bunch of classic songs being the result. Their fourth album, ‘Destroyer’, is an anomaly. It’s really a Bob Ezrin album, and fits in with his own discography better than it fits into Kiss’s. Ezrin co-wrote almost all of the songs, and, as with all Ezrin productions, if you can’t deliver, he’ll find someone who can. Hence the un-credited appearance of Ezrin’s go-to ghost guitarist, Dick Wagner. Admirably, after ‘Destroyer’, KISS again kept it ‘real’ on their next 2 albums, ‘Rock and Roll Over’ and ‘Love Gun’. After that, KISS’s corporate charter would begin to accommodate the band members’ every whim and dysfunction, while the public face of the band remained intact.

One could say that Ace Frehley’s solo career started right after he recorded his lead vocal for ‘Shock Me’ in 1977. On everything he recorded with KISS after that, he sang the lead vocals, and played all the guitars and most of the bass. It was a unique arrangement, and one that KISS’s corporate charter apparently allowed. And so on the studio side of KISS’s ‘Alive II’ album, the only song Ace appears on is his ‘Rocket Ride’. This, in turn, implies that charter also allowed for session musicians to ‘ghost’ for the Spaceman, as Bob Kulick plays the solos on the rest of the material, uncredited.

This would be Ace’s modus operandi with KISS’s next three records. Understandably, he sang and played all the guitars on his solo album, but when KISS reconvened for the ‘Dynasty’ album, Ace contributed 3 songs, each recorded separately from the band in his home studio and with solo album session man Anton Fig on drums. Same with ‘Unmasked’.

The Space Ace was absent completely from the sessions for ‘Music from “The Elder”, as Frehley refused to travel to Toronto to work with Bob Ezrin. Ace mailed his recordings to Ezrin, who rejected most of what he heard. Ace went ‘missing’ when the album was completed, and KISS decided not to tour the album. Ace says in his book that he quit the band in 1982, after recording sessions for ‘Elder’ wrapped, but perhaps ‘retired from active duty’ descries it better. KISS would continue to feature him on the covers of albums that he had absolutely nothing to do with for the next few years.

Four new studio recordings appeared on the ‘Killers’ collection, and there was Ace on the cover… but once again an uncredited Bob Kulick played lead guitar on each song. The ‘Creatures of the Night’ album was written and recorded without Frehley’s involvement, but Ace’s face is on the original cover… AND he appeared in the ‘I Love it Loud’ video, perpetuating the lie that all was well in KISSville. Only when KISS planned to hit the road in support of ‘Creatures’ and Frehley declined to participate, were KISS finally forced to announce that Ace had spaced out… over a year after he ‘quit’.

Peter Criss contributed even less. The jury is still out as to whether it’s him playing on Side Four of Alive II, so we’ll leave that one alone, but the sum total of the Cat Man’s contributions to KISS’s post-solo album output is one song: ‘Dirty Livin’ from the ‘Dynasty’ album. Anton Fig played on the rest of the album and on ALL of ‘Unmasked’. Criss stepped off the KISS merry-go-round after the Dynasty tour, sat out ‘Unmasked’ completely, and was (unanimously) finally voted out of the band just before filming a video of the song ‘Shandi’, a song he didn’t play on from an album he had nothing to do with.

KISS’s records at this point should have come with labels: “WARNING: MAY CONTAIN LESS THAN 75% KISS”. The truth is, this band had broken up along time ago. But The KISS Army didn’t need to know that… Here’s a section of Gene Simmons’ biography that explains why the band hid his Ace and Peter’s status from the world for as long as they did:

“We tried to move things along as smoothly as possible. We put (Ace’s) face on the cover and pretended that he played on the album… We were concerned that our fans wouldn’t be able to deal with the departures of two members… It would be devastating to them and to their idea of us.”

Of course, what this boils down to is a fear of line-up changes damaging the brand and having a negative impact on cash flow. To be fair, Ace and Peter both played along too, supporting the sham for years, no doubt also concerned about the gravy train drying up. But continuing the charade didn’t ensure continued success; ‘Unmasked’ tanked even with Criss’ name and face on the cover, as did ‘Elder’ and ‘Creatures’, both sporting Ace’s face and name. The strategy of deception didn’t work. The fraud the band had been perpetrating on its fans had failed.

maxresdefault

KISS’ next move was to totally re-invent themselves by taking the make-up off. But Frehley and Criss remained one-quarter shareholders; Frehley continued to earn his share right up through the ‘Lick it Up’ and ‘Animalize’ albums, and was eventually bought out. Criss’s deal lasted even longer. Did Frehley and Criss deserve to earn their one quarter shares after their material contributions to the corporation ceased? Maybe. Their initial work helped make KISS a pop culture phenomenon, a brand that continues to thrive (and earn) to this day. But small wonder that there’s always been considerable animosity between the Stanley/Simmons and Criss/Frehley camps; one half of the ‘band’ consistently contributed more than the other, yet all four original ‘members’ received an equal share of corporate earnings.

Fast-forward to 1996 and the inevitable ‘Classic KISS’ reunion. No doubt new contracts were signed by Frehley and Criss, but otherwise nothing much had changed. After a monumentally successful reunion tour, the inevitable reunion album was recorded… aaaand session drummer Kevin Valentine plays drums on every song on ‘Psycho Circus’ except ‘Into the Void’. In fact, ‘Void’ has the distinction of being the only song on ‘Circus’ on which all four members of KISS perform. Ace plays three solos on the album, and Bruce Kulick and Tommy Thayer play all the rest. ‘Psycho Circus’ was marketed as the first studio album by the band’s original lineup since 1979’s ‘Dynasty’; with Ace only appearing on 3 tracks and Peter on only one, the ‘Dynasty’ comparison was perhaps more apt than intended.

Having a discussion about the ethics of KISS is a little silly, I know. This part of their history makes more sense when you stop thinking about KISS as a band and start thinking of them as a business. But didn’t that business have a responsibility to its customers? Didn’t KISS fans deserve the truth from their heroes? Did the very fans that supported this commercial juggernaut deserve to have their loyalty exploited?

You Wanted the Best, But Did You Get It? Up until 1978, sure; after that, buyer beware.

Re-master of Reality

AC/DC OFFICIAL NEWS ANNOUNCEMENT

BIGGEST ROCK BAND IN WORLD TO RETIRE ON TOP: AC/DC CALLS IT QUITS   January 28 2009

Hot on the heels of their most successful release ever, fifteenth studio album ‘Black Ice’ (Sony), Australian hard rock band AC/DC have decided to end the band after touring in support of what will now be their final record. The band feels strongly that it would be impossible to top the worldwide success of ‘Black Ice’, and would rather wind up their career on a high note. Despite the fact that Black Ice was released exclusively in physical formats, and only through Walmart in North America, ‘Black Ice’ peaked at No. 1 in 29 countries, including Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. The record shipped 6 million copies worldwide by December. “This is gonna be tough to beat,” says guitarist Angus Young. “You gotta know when to end it, right? This seems like a pretty good time to call it a day, before we embarrass ourselves!.” Expect AC/DC’s farewell tour to wrap up in 2010, after which the band will enjoy a well-deserved retirement.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

AEROSMITH DISBANDS, CITES INABILITY TO WRITE SONGS WHILE SOBER   September 4th, 1986/Framingham, MA

Boston-based Hard Rock band AEROSMITH have announced they are disbanding. After attending rehabs and declaring themselves 100% sober, the band has discovered they are utterly incapable of writing Aerosmith music. Last year’s mediocre ‘Done With Mirrors’ was written while the band tried to appear sober; writing the next record completely without the aid of illicit substances has yielded disappointing results. Manager Tim Collins and Geffen Records A&R John Kalodner enlisted an army of ‘song doctors’ to help write a follow-up, but the band flatly rejected the idea. “Now that I’m straight all the time, I just don’t feel like a badass anymore. We just aren’t Aerosmith without the drugs”, said guitarist Joe Perry. “It’s been a great ride, but I guess it’s over,” added vocalist Steven Tyler. “We’re clean and sober now, but our mojo ain’t workin’. Consider us all on permanent vacation.”

BULLETIN: DATELINE 6 NOV 1978

KISS ANOUNCES RETIREMENT, FRANCHISE PLANS

Legendary theatrical rock group KISS will retire from writing and performing early next year, inside sources say. The infamous shock rock quartet plan to expand KISS-related activities in other avenues. All four band members have signed on to star in a Saturday morning children’s variety show called ‘The Rockin’ Adventures of KISS!’, which is slated to debut in June of next year on. KISS will also enter the franchise market, with different musicians from across the country donning the costumes and make-up, allowing different versions of KISS to operate in different regions (KISS Vegas, KISS LA, etc). KISS has also signed an agreement with Disney to present nightly KISS concerts using animatronic versions of KISS in both theme park locations. Says Gene Simmons, “While there will be no more KISS records, the brand will continue and expand. Because it’s all about the brand. And the fans, right. The brand and the fans.”

June 12 1984 Hollywood CA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: GUITARIST TONY IOMMI ANNOUNCES NEW GROUP ‘THE END’

Former Black Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi has put together a new band, The End. “Doing my solo album (‘Seventh Star’) was great fun, but I want to get back to a band situation. I’m happy to be working with Geezer again, and excited to see what kind of music comes of it.” Joining Iommi in The End will be former Deep Purple vocalist Ian Gillan and ex-ELO/Move drummer Bev Bevan. “Geezer and I talked about having Bill Ward in, but we thought the better of it. The record companies would probably try to slap the old Sabbath name on it, and after Ozzy died in that horrible plane incident, there will never be another Black Sabbath record. Besides, Bill’s in rehab.” The new group is planning an album for the spring of next year, tentatively titled ‘Born Again’.

BULLETIN / BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND DEC 18 1985

JUDAS PRIEST ABANDON NEW ALBUM SESSIONS, HALFORD ENTERS REHAB

Judas Priest lead vocalist Rob Halford has entered a rehab in Van Nuys, California to address an addiction to alcohol and prescription drugs. A spokesman for the singer states that Halford ‘…has taken the steps necessary to get himself together and will return to the band early in the new year.’ This move has halted recording sessions for the follow-up to Priest’s highly successful ‘Defenders of the Faith’ album. The band began recording material for a double album, tentatively titled ‘Twin Turbos’, but bassist Ian Hill says the band will “probably scrap everything and start over when Rob is back.” Hill continued, “We’re going to take this time to reassess where we are right now. There’s a lot of change happening in heavy music right now, and we want to be sure not to get caught up in the current trends or fads or what have you. We have to stay true to ourselves and our fans, and make sure we are honoring what Priest is really all about.”

7 April 1998 Huddersfield, UK / FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

STEVE HARRIS REPORTS: IRON MAIDEN GUITARIST SITUATION SORTED

JUST ANNOUNCED: Iron Maiden guitarist Janick Gers has decided to leave the band. In a statement released today, Gers stated “I had heard that Bruce (Dickinson) was coming back, everybody knew it would happen, but I wasn’t aware that they’d been talking to Adrian (Smith) as well. Maiden’s not a 3-guitar band, it’s a little much, isn’t it? I thought ‘If I step down, then it will be a proper reunion, won’t it?’ I don’t want to be the one standing in the way of that, you know.” Despite the fact that Gers’ tenure in the band included what some would say were Maiden’s weakest records, Harris has nothing but respect for the guitarist. Harris: “Janick feels he is doing the right thing, and we support him 100%. We thank him for the years he gave to Maiden and wish him all the best.” Harris has also dismisses claims that Gers was ‘forced out’ to accommodate Smith “Nonsense. I would have done with 3 guitars, ’cause it was a difficult situation and firing anybody wouldn’t have been right,  but Janick stepped up of his own accord and saved us from having to do that.”  Gers is reportedly planning to re-form White Spirit.

May the 13th, 1996/Via New Musical Express

Ex-Lizzy Man to Honor Mother’s Wishes; Lizzy-Without-Lynott Will Not Happen

American guitarist Scott Gorham wishes it to be known that he no longer intends ‘re-activate’ beloved rock group ‘Thin Lizzy’, as he had stated earlier this year in several music papers. Gorham’s change of heart comes soon after Philomena Lynott, the mother of Thin Lizzy frontman Phillip Lynott, made several public pleas for Gorham and fellow ex-Lizzy member John Sykes to “stop this madness before it starts”, and to “respect my son, who you have called your brother” (see NME March 26). Gorham reportedly met with Mrs. Lynott at her home in Howth some weeks ago, and finally made a public announcement yesterday. “We have all agreed to honor Philomena’s wishes.” said Gorham, during a short press conference on MTv UK. “She actually made us swear to it… We all took a vow and swore to let the legend of Thin Lizzy rest in peace.”

24 January 2010 HANOVER, GERMANY / FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SCORPIONS ANNOUNCE 3 FINAL ALBUMS AND 6 FAREWELL TOURS!

German hard rockers SCORPIONS have decided that their upcoming album, titled ‘Sting in the Tail’, will be their last. The band will then launch their final world tour to promote the album and to thank their loyal fans for supporting them for almost 50 years. SCORPIONS will then release another final album, called ‘Comeblack’, and embark on yet another farewell tour. This tour will be filmed for release on DVD, to be entitled ‘Get Your Sting’, and will showcase the SCORPIONS last-ever concert performances. Next up is another DVD, ‘Unplugged in Athens’, filmed on either the fifteenth or sixteenth leg of the band’s last tour ever. SCORPIONS final final album, to be called ‘Return to Forever’, will follow, followed by another string of final farewell world tours. SCORPIONS fans can expect the band to continue breaking up well into 2016, six years after first announcing their retirement.

September 1986, SOUNDS: “What’s Next for Purple People?”

After conquering the hard rock world with their one-off reunion album, ‘Perfect Strangers’, the members of Deep Purple are weighing their options. The first Deep Purple MkII album in 11 years went Top 20 in 9 countries, and has been certified Gold or Platinum in 6 countries, while the US leg of the Perfect Strangers tour was the 2nd highest-grossing tour of 1985. But no one seems to feel much like celebrating. “I have no idea what I’m going to do next, but I have to tell you I’m glad this Purple thing is finally over. Again.” The singer won’t confirm, but rumors of a post-show punch-up between Gillan and guitarist Ritchie Blackmore after their final Wembley show are circulating, and none of the other members are talking. Bassist Roger Glover: “Well, all I can say about that is there’s always been sort of a volatile chemistry within this band, and I think we were wise when we all agreed to limit this to one album. Anything more than that and it just wouldn’t work.” Jon Lord agrees. “Of course, I’m very proud of this album. We all are. But let’s leave it be, shall we? Time to move on to other things.”

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT October 31, 1986   Metallica HQ, San Rafael, CA

METALLICA BREAK UP AFTER TRAGIC LOSS OF BASS PLAYER

Following the tragic death of bassist Cliff Burton, the remaining members of pioneering thrash metal band Metallica have decided to call it quits. “Cliff is irreplaceable”, said drummer Lars Ulrich. “Trying to do so would be ridiculous. We’re going to what Zeppelin did; just end it. Honestly, we were running out of Dave Mustaine riffs anyway.” The pair plan to break the news to Kirk Hammett “pretty soon”. Ulrich plans to spend his free time learning how to play the drums. Frontman James Hetfield is rumored to be planning an as-yet-untitled 2-part country music concept album, centered around his gun collection. Dave Mustaine could not be reached for comment.

MUSICNEWS.COM: MAY 19 1996

VAN HALEN REVEAL IDENTITY OF NEW LEAD SINGER

The VAN HALEN NEWS DESK (http://www.vhnd.com) announced this morning that storied hard rockers VAN HALEN have hired a new lead singer. Despite rumors of auditioning several ‘big names’ over the past 5 months (Meatloaf, Iggy Pop, Regis Philbin, Elmer Fudd), the VH brothers have instead decided on a virtual unknown with no experience or ability, but with one important qualification: Malcom Van Halen is drummer Alex Van Halen’s son. On hiring his nephew, a professional photographer without any sort of musical track record, Eddie Van Halen remarked, “So what? He’s family. Besides, who cares? Roth sucked last time around and we still sold tickets. No one listens to this band for the vocals. And if Mal doesn’t work out, there’s always my nephew Aric.”

SQUATNEY, LONDON, UK

FOR ALL MEDIA-22/05/2016

HEAVY METAL LEGENDS SPINAL TAP TO RE-REUNITE, TOUR IMMINENT

Veteran British rockers SPINAL TAP have reunited once again. The band will launch a world tour on July 1st, weather permitting. The crowd-funded ‘Where Are We Now?’ tour will feature the band’s ‘smallest production yet’, and each show will include the classic album ‘Shark Sandwich’ (Polymer, 1977) played in its entirety. Select shows ‘may’ ‘perhaps’ ‘possibly’ be recorded for a live album. The band are currently auditioning drummers (interested parties should contact eatonhoggprod@tap.com.uk, must be able to play the drums by July 1). Support on the ‘Where Are We Now?’ tour will be UFO and Blue Oyster Cult. #gofundyourself/taptour

 

Thrash Course in Brain Injury

On June 22, 2010, ‘The Big Four’: Metallica, Slayer, Megadeth and Anthrax, performed together for the first time. The concert was filmed and transmitted via satellite to over 450 movie theatres in the US and over 350 movie theaters across Europe, Canada, and Latin America; screenings were arranged later in Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand. A DVD album from the event was released in late 2010, which achieved Gold status in Germany, Platinum status in Brazil, and Double Platinum status in the US and Australia. This combination of bands played a total of 14 stadium shows together in 2010/2011, with the average number of people in attendance at each show at around 50,000. Then add in those in attendance at the 800 movie theatres streaming the event live; now add the number of people who bought the multi-million selling DVD set.

Ladies and gentlemen: That’s HUGE. All four of these bands were almost a quarter century into their careers, and still wielded the drawing power to pull off an event of this magnitude. In the midst of this monumental success, it’s easy to forget that the humble origins of the hugely successful Thrash Metal movement can be traced back to one ambitious kid… one of three key characters in a truly amazing story of fierce self-belief, independent spirit, and passion for music. Decisions made and chances taken by these three people would influence the fate of six young bands, and would in turn change the sound and character of heavy metal music forever.

In the Spring of 1981, a young Danish immigrant named Lars Ulrich, aged 17, places an ad in a local paper looking to form a band. Mentioned in the add are NWOBHM bands Diamond Head, Tygers of Pan Tang, and Iron Maiden. James Hetfield answers the ad, and a friendship is born.

While Ulrich and Hetfield work to put a band together, 20-year old Oz Records employee Brian Slagel is importing NWOBHM records for the store and publishing a fanzine that covers the LA metal scene. Slagel plans to release a compilation album of LA bands, and Ulrich asks Slagel if his (as yet unformed) band can contribute a track; Slagel agrees. Ulrich and Hetfield record a rough demo of a song Hetfield wrote for his previous band, Leather Charm, titled ‘Hit The Lights’. Hetfield plays rhythm guitar and bass; another local kid, Lloyd Grant, plays the guitar solo.

metallica-power-metal-demo1982. Ulrich completes his band, which includes Dave Mustaine on guitar. A friend of Ulrich’s, Ron Quintana, is planning to start publishing a metal ‘zine, and can’t decide between the names ‘Metallica’ and ‘Metal Mania’ for his publication. He settles on the latter, and suggests the former to Ulrich. Quintana is also a major player in the underground tape trading culture of the day, where unsigned bands trade demo tapes through the mail to get their music exposure. The newly-christened Metallica record a demo called ‘Power Metal’ in April; it hits the tape trading network via Quintana and gives Ulrich’s band it’s first exposure to metalheads outside of the LA scene.

In June, Slagel’s comp, titled ‘The New Heavy Metal Revue Presents Metal Massacre‘ is released. Metallica’s track, as rough a recording as it is, causes much buzz in the underground, standing out against the ‘LA’ sound of the other bands on the record. Another demo tape is recorded the following month, titled ‘No Life ’til Leather’. This tape is also widely distributed via the thriving underground tape trading market.

47727It’s around this time that guitarist Kerry King sees Metallica play in LA, an experience he will later call ‘life changing’. His own band, Slayer, has been playing mostly covers, but his Metallica experience inspires him to start writing faster, heavier stuff. Also in the summer of ’82, in San Francisco’s Bay Area, a band called Exodus, which includes guitarist Kirk Hammett, is demoing their NWOBHM-inspired material. Brian Slagel’s ‘Metal Massacre II’ is released in the fall, featuring a track by a Bay Area band called Trauma; their bassist, Cliff Burton, is courted by Metallica after Hetfield and Ulrich see the band perform in LA. Burton agrees to join, but only if the band will move north. Metallica leaves LA and moves to San Francisco.

On the other side of the country, A New York band called Anthrax records a demo of originals with heavy riffs and dynamic vocals, and a new band formed by New Jersey punk rock veterans called Overkill is abandoning covers and starting to write originals, putting their own street level spin on the dramatic style of classic Priest and early Sabbath. On both sides of the country, young American metal bands are moving metal forward, forging a style that, while still firmly rooted in the NWOBHM and the classic metal before it, pushes the boundaries of speed and power.

hqdefaultOn to 1983. In Febuary, Slayer completes the first song written in the band’s new direction: ‘Black Magic’. Also in February, Bay Area band Exodus records a 2nd demo. By March, Metallica’s ‘No Life ’til Leather’ demo is causing a considerable buzz, and catches the attention of New Jersey retailer John Zazula. Johnny Z is involved in the tape trading culture on the East Coast, owns a record shop called Rock and Roll Heaven, and also promotes local hard rock and metal shows. He is floored by the tape, and offers to broker a record deal for the band. Zazula gets to work booking shows for Metallica in the New York/New Jersey area.

Metallica are ready to record an album. Brian Slagel, working his fledgling label, dubbed ‘Metal Blade Records’, out of his mom’s garage in the San Fernando Valley, doesn’t have the funds to sign the band or finance a recording. The band records a 3rd demo, their first with new bassist Burton, to shop to labels. A few weeks later, the band are staying in the Z’s house, prepping for a string of dates put together by Zazula to create buzz and provide showcase opportunities. No labels are interested; Johnny Z scrapes enough cash together for the band to hit the studio. He forms a label, Megaforce Records, so he can release Metallica’s debut album himself.

During Metallica’s East Coast ‘tour’, it becomes apparent that continuing forward with Dave Mustaine will be impossible; he is fired. Kirk Hammett, of Bay Area band Exodus, flies out to replace him (bringing some choice Exodus riffs with him). Just before Overkill are to enter the studio to demo songs they have written from 1981- 1982, guitarist Dan Spitz quits to join Anthrax, who have just appeared as support to Metallica on a few of their East Coast dates. With Spitz now on board, Anthrax records a 2nd demo.

nknknkSlayer, still working to write faster and heavier material, are asked by Brian Slagel to record a song for his Metal Massacre III; the band contributes ‘Agressive Perfector’, and demos an additional 5 originals. Slagel, who missed out on Metallica, signs Slayer to his Metal Blade label. Slagel’s offer to Slayer includes the band financing their own recording. Johnny Z somehow comes up with $15,000 for Metallica’s recording sessions, and Megaforce releases it’s first record on July 25th: Metallica’s ‘Kill ‘Em All’.

Exodus have replaced Kirk Hammett with Rick Hunolt, and release a 3rd ‘demo’ in July; actually it’s a rehearsal tape, but it clearly shows the band now following the same tightly structured, vicious metal attack as Metallica.

Soldiers%20of%20Metal%20(Demo)New Jersey’s Overkill wrap up recording their first demo in September. The tape is a sensation on the now-red hot tape trading network. In November, Johnny Z’s Megaforce, is well on the way to selling through it’s first pressing, and releases it’s 2nd record: a 7″ single from Anthrax called ‘Heavy Metal Soldiers’. And as 1983 draws to an end, Slayer completes work on their debut ‘Show No Mercy’ in Novermber; Slagel rushes the release, and it’s out in December. Overkill record a 2nd demo.

In February of 1984, Megaforce releases the first Anthrax album, ‘Fistful of Metal’. Malcom Dome reviews the album in Kerrang! Magazine, and coins the phrase ‘Thrash Metal’, inspired by the song title ‘Metal Thrashing Mad’. The genre has been gradually moving away from the NWOBHM style and towards a tougher, tighter and more intense sound. Dome’s term catches on quickly and soon becomes the accepted name of the genre.

Meanwhile, Dave Mustaine has spent his time since exiting Metallica trying to put a band of his own together. After 6 months of searching for a vocalist, and anxious to get his project off the ground, Mustaine decides to sing himself. Still not a complete band, Megadeth plays it’s first live shows in February of 1984, with Slayer’s Kerry King filling in on 2nd guitar. Back in Jersey, Overkill’s ‘Death Rider’ appears on Slagel’s ‘Metal Massacre V’. Metal Church, Voivod, and Fates Warning also appear on the comp. The heavy metal underground is now spawning an abundance of bands in the rapidly-developing Thrash style.

4250Megadeth records their first demo in March as a 3-piece. Mustaine includes a song he wrote while in Metallica, ‘Mechanix’, and increases the tempo considerably to further distinguish it from Metallica’s ‘The Four Horsemen’, a reworked version of Mustaine’s song recorded for ‘Kill ‘Em All’. As Metallica ready their 2nd album, they put together a song called ‘Ride the Lightning’, which includes several of Mustaine’s riffs and ideas. The song will also become the album’s title track.

As the genre gains strength, Exodus, one of the bands present at Ground Zero (the band first formed in 1979), seems to have been left behind. They finally enter the studio to record an album at the beginning of the summer. The songs ‘Die By His Hand’ and ‘Impaler’ are prepped for recording, but are dropped when the band learns that Metallica have recorded songs (‘Creeping Death’ and ‘Trapped Under Ice’) for their 2nd album containing riffs Kirk Hammett wrote while in Exodus. Exodus complete the album, called ‘A Lesson In Violence’, and release two songs from the sessions into the tape trading underground. The tape is a huge hit and anticipation of their debut full-length is intense.

Overkill_EPBy the winter of 1984, Mustaine is fielding offers from labels, Exodus are struggling with album titles and cover ideas, while both Anthrax and Slayer have released albums, and Metallica have released two. Overkill release a 4-song E.P. on a local indie, also beating Exodus and Megadeth into the record shops. The E.P. is an underground sensation, selling through its initial pressing quickly.

1985. Anthrax hire Joey Belladonna as lead vocalist and hastily record an E.P. to get something on the market, showcase Joey and maintain momentum. ‘Armed and Dangerous’ is released on Megaforce in March. Megadeth, after 6 months of shopping for a label, sign with NY-based Combat Records, as they have offered the band the largest advance: $8,000.00. Megadeth begin working on their debut. The band burn through the 8k, mostly spent on drugs and food, and Combat coughs up another $4,000.00.

Overkill complete work on their debut album, ‘Feel The Fire’, for Johnny Z’s Megaforce Records. The album is released in April to a rabid underground audience. Exodus finally releases their album, now titled ‘Bonded by Blood’, on Combat. It, too, is a success, but the impact of the album is diminished considerably by its delayed release. Megadeth fires their producer and completes their debut album themselves. It is released in June, over two years since Mustaine’s exit from Metallica. With the release of Megadeth’s ‘Killing is my Business… And Business is Good!’, the last of the ‘Big Four’ is now on the map.

Within a few months, every one of these six bands would find its way to a major label (Exodus would be last, in 1990). All six still exist today, although only four of them have transcended the ‘Thrash’ genre and achieved massive mainstream success. I’ll leave it for others to postulate how the ‘Original Six’ (to borrow a hockey term) ultimately became the ‘Big Four’… But it’s clear which band led the way. Who would have dreamed that Thrash Metal, the ugly offspring of the NWOBHM, would evolve into a the platinum-selling, stadium-filling monster that it evolved into? That little Danish guy behind the drum kit dreamed that dream… He can be a real pain in the ass sometimes, but hey– maybe he deserves a little slack.